We’re on it!

By Kincade Stirek, Conservation Assistant

When rivulets, creeks and streams disconnect, nature’s hydrological systems are endangered. One lost waterway connector can impact multiple downstream segments. Reconnecting The Truckee’s tributaries, the lifeblood of our watershed, is what the TRWC has been working towards for the past 20 years. Stream by stream. Brook by brook. Creek by creek.

The Dry Creek Restoration Project, led by Beth Christman, was first assessed in 2013 in collaboration with the USFS, and is now underway—adding to TRWC’s current list of dozens of ongoing restoration sites. The project focuses on reviving five miles of actively eroding perennial and intermittent stream channels covering 150 acres of meadowland. The area lies in the center of the triangulation of three reservoirs, (Boca, Prosser Creek & Stampede) in the remote Russel Valley community.

Over 150 years of logging, grazing and development has caused widespread erosion, destroying the hydrological benefits of Dry Creek and its connecting waterways. This erosive domino effect leads to increased sedimentation flowing into streams and meadows—and ultimately, into The TruckeeRiver itself— impacting everything from water quality to species diversity.

The multi-faceted Dry Creek Restoration Project is based on a range of objectives, encompassing wildlife habitat improvement  ,fire hazard prevention and climate change initiatives. Revealed here is a partial list:

Dry Creek Restoration Project Objectives

•    Restore degraded streams, wetlands, riparian & upland areas

•    Revive watershed habitats for native fish, wildlife & endemic plants

•    Prevent the spread and colonization of invasive species

•    Manage forest health and wildfire risks

•    Minimize ecosystem impacts from existing & new development.

•    Address climate change science in all planning efforts.

If this list sounds like a tall order, that’s because, well, it is. Which is why the TRWC is teaming up with the US Forest Service to implement the Dry Creek Restoration Plan. But this still is not enough. Carrying out the plan will need additional charitable funding—as well as ‘boots-in-the- water’ volunteer assistance.

To keep volunteers alerted (and active) The Truckee River Watershed Council will conduct public site tours and will schedule and organize hands-on workdays. Additionally, a huge revegetation effort took place on Truckee River Day 2016.

Keep watching the Dry Creek Restoration progress bar on our website to track the project’s development. And discover the impact your contribution can make.

Dry Creek Restoration Progress

The Truckee River Watershed Council oversees this coordinated effort in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service. Other partners include the Bella Vista Foundation, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.

The Truckee River Watershed Council oversees this coordinated effort in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service. Other partners include the Bella Vista Foundation, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Funding comes from the donors of the Truckee River Watershed Council—which includes Truckee residents, vacation homeowners, outdoor enthusiasts and people like you.

To play your part in restoring this hydrologically critical watershed area, contact Brenda Gilbert at 530-550-8760, x5.

To stay up to date on various programs and volunteer opportunties for restoration projects like Dry Creek subscribe to our newsletter here.

You’ll feel connected knowing you we’re on it! (And so will Dry Creek.)

 

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